Climate modelling at vineyard sale in a climate change context

Climate modelling at vineyard sale in a climate change context

The integration of local climate variability (bioclimatic indices and phenological modelling) into regionalized climate change simulations provides an assessment of the impacts of climate change at the vineyard scale. The knowledge gained using this methodology is the increasing horizontal resolution that better suits the winegrowers concerns.  Overall conclusion highlights the fact that thermal differences within each site are similar to the thermal differences simulated by the climate model between 1986-2005 and 2031-2050 (increase of 200-500 GDD) and between 1986 and 2081-2100 (increase of 500-1000 GDD). Hence, these results give the local winegrowers/stakeholders information necessary to understand the current functioning as well as historical and future viticulture trends at the scale of their site that may facilitate decisions about future strategies. Get more information in the Deliverable “Climate modelling at vineyards scale in a climate change...
Shifts in climate suitability for wine production as a result of climate change

Shifts in climate suitability for wine production as a result of climate change

Following the results of the analysis on climate evolution in the Cotnari pilot site (Romania), where climatic change brought between 1961-2010 climate suitability for the red wine production (https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00704-017-2033-9), ADVICLIM researches reveal similar evolutions at the fine scale, favorable to the quality of wines in all the other pilot sites of the project. This time the assessment of the impact of climate change on suitability for the wine production is based on the analysis of the Huglin index values for the 1951-1990 and 1991-2013…. Get more...
The 2017 vintage in Loire Valley

The 2017 vintage in Loire Valley

In the Loire Valley, the growing season of 2017 has been particularly illustrative of the critical role of climate in growing grapes and making wine. After an initial warm period in the beginning of spring that lead to an early onset of vegetative growth, a severe frost event took place in April, the most devastating since 1991. For some wine producing regions in the Loire Valley, such as the wine appellation of Savennières, 70% of the vineyards were affected and as a result, harvest volumes were low in 2017, which are expected to have important economic consequences in the following years. However, a warm and dry summer period has meant that the onset of veraison (beginning of berry ripening) occurred two to three weeks earlier than normal, very similar to 2003. As this earliness has shifted the ripening period to a warmer period of the year, conditions favored berry ripening and allowed winegrowers to produce high quality...
The 2017 vintage in Navarra and Rioja

The 2017 vintage in Navarra and Rioja

This vintage (2017) will be remembered as the earliest one to date in Rioja and Navarra wine regions. Season advancement was majorly caused by warm temperatures from March until early July. Temperatures in July and August were not far from the average, September being also warm. Additionally, those parts in the region at higher altitude suffered in late April a dramatic frost, by far much more destructive than the last widespread frost event in 1999 or, more probably, only of similar magnitude than that re1967ported in . Thus, as a consequence of earlier phenology and lower yields due to frost damage, harvest was advanced between 2 and 4 weeks from the average, the greatest advancement in the coolest areas. With regards to water availability, non-irrigated vineyards have faced to mild to severe scarcity, as the little rain received last autumn and winter was not enough to fill up water reservoirs in the soil, and rainfall during the activity period, although within the range of normality, could not overcome that deficit. Grape technological ripeness was properly reached, although phenolic ripeness was to some extent compromised at some vineyards due to the short time elapsed between veraison and...
The 2017 vintage in the Sussex

The 2017 vintage in the Sussex

A warmer & sunnier than average March leading to slightly earlier Budburst for most varieties, followed by a cooler second half of April. A devastating air frost on the night of the 26th April, destroyed up to 80% of new growth, with the highest proportion of damage on the early bud-break varieties. Vineyard thermometers showed temperatures as low as -5.8C. However secondary growth looked promising with a hot June & July, unfortunately August, September & October turned out to be cool and wet, slowing down the ripening period and providing ideal conditions for Peronospora (Downy) & Botrytis. Oidium (Powdery), although worse than last year, was not really a serious problem. August & September gave us a total of almost 250mm of rain, with precipitation at least once every 24 hours. A new problem, the fruit fly – Spotted Wing Drosophila suzukii (SWD) also gave us a major problem around harvest, causing serious damage to red varieties, particularly the Acolon. One to watch out for next year. Overall, a very tricky year...
Université Rennes 2 Le Centre national de la recherche scientifique L’Institut Français de la Vigne et du Vin Inra Hochschule Geisenheim University Plumpton college Bordeaux Sciences Agro Universitatea de Ştiinţe Agricole şi Medicină Veterinară 'Ion Ionescu de la Brad' ecoclimasol